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Virus Meadow
By: And Also the Trees
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# 19 is...

Pretty great list. I really don't consider this album or most on the list as "goth" per se but the review in that article says it best. "And Also The Trees remain an extraordinarily hard band to categorise, which perhaps explains why they seem to have been squeezed out of the art-rock canon, a travesty which we can but hope will be rectified in due course."
19: AND ALSO THE TREES
And Also The Trees remain an extraordinarily hard band to categorise, which perhaps explains why they seem to have been squeezed out of the art-rock canon, a travesty which we can but hope will be rectified in due course.
Their fine self-titled debut album was produced by The Cure’s Lol Tolhurst, and sounds like it. On their sophomore effort, 1986’s Virus Meadow, they established their own unique musical fingerprint, using dub-infused atmospherics to complement Jones’ increasingly lofty lyrical content, a hysterical and imagistic extension of British folk’s darkest themes. “Creating an ambience is very important,” remarked guitarist (and Simon’s brother) Justin Jones in 1985. Nowhere do the band better achieve this than on the masterfully tense ‘The Headless Clay Woman’, which to my ears at least presages the occult-tinged post-rock of Slint.
Hailing from the tiny village of Inkberrow, deep in the Worcestershire countryside, And Also The Trees were motivated by the sonic vigour of post-punk but refracted it through their own rural identity. The resulting music is unwaveringly nutty and often beautiful, spanning feather-light dream-pop, echo-drenched rock ‘n roll and bloodthirsty chamber-folk, all united by the hammy voice of Simon Huw Jones.
(CLAY RECORDS, 1986)
VIRUS MEADOW
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If Virus Meadow isn't goth, I'm don't know what is. The funny thing about the "goth" label is that no one seems to want to be tagged with it. And yet, goth exists, and continues to grow and evolve. I was stunned to see AATT on the list as I just read the Encyclopedia of Gothica and for all of the books wit, insight, and clear love of the genre, AATT didn't get a mention. Unlike Punk that has a more clearly defined sound, the definition of goth is more, well, grey and shadowy.